Indirect RF Hazards

Part 3 on Safety

Safety is an important topic in ham radio.  There are 11 questions on electrical hazards in the USA Technician class license exam pool, 13 questions on tower safety and associated grounding, and 13 questions on radio frequency (RF) hazards.

Part 1 on general electrical hazards and Part 2 on contact RF hazards were posted previously.  This post will address indirect RF hazards.  In case you are not familiar with the specifics of RF energy, refer to our post on the subject.

Here we are concerned about non-contact RF energy.  A long and involved topic (sorry about that) but full of useful detail.

While it involves radiation, RF energy radiates at lower wavelengths where it is least hazardous.

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From the electromagnetic spectrum diagram above we see that radio waves are on the low end of energy levels.  As the frequency increases (wavelengths decrease) the energy in electron volts increases exponentially.  Energy above 250eV (or so) is ionizing, which in addition to radiation burns can cause cell damage and mutations, leading to cancer and other maladies, as would radioactive material.

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Fortunately for hams, all radio frequencies are well below the ionizing radiation energy levels.

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Ham radio operators are radio  active, not radioactive. 🙂Amateur radio activeNow just because RF radiation is non-ionizing doesn’t mean it is completely safe.  Besides the direct contact hazard, exposure to radio frequency energy may cause localized tissue heating, particularly in the eyes and male reproductive area (here’s where a lady ham has an advantage, hihi).  Non-thermal effects of RF radiation are being studied constantly because, while compelling, they are somewhat ambiguous and unproven.

Because RF energy has this radiated exposure risk, rules and regulations have arisen to protect people from such hazards.  In the USA this is done at the federal level by both the FCC (radio communications) and OSHA (occupational).  There are also guidelines for RF radiation published by the ARRL and the IEEE.  Internationally, most countries apart from the US have similar guidelines, as does the World Health Organization (WHO).  References to some of these are given at the end of this presentation.

Specific to US radio amateurs, the FCC instituted RF field exposure limits called Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE). Continue reading

Contact RF Hazards

Part 2 on Safety

Safety is an important topic in ham radio.  There are 11 questions on electrical hazards in the USA Technician class license exam pool, 13 questions on tower safety and associated grounding, and 13 questions on radio frequency (RF) hazards.

Part 1 on general electrical hazards was posted previously.  This post will address contact RF hazards.  In case you are not familiar with the specifics of RF energy, refer to our post on the subject.  A future post will cover the broad context of non-contact or indirect RF (radiation) safety.  Both direct and indirect RF exposure will heat living tissue.

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Here we are concerned about direct contact with a RF signal of significant energy.  This might happen if a person or animal touches a conductor carrying RF energy.  This most likely happens when someone touches an antenna element while the radio is transmitting.  It’s painful…..as in, full of pain.

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Another risk of RF contact is while working on live transmitter equipment or an antenna connector.  It’s not hard to accidentally key the mic with your hands inside a transmitter enclosure or while touching an un-mated RF connector.

Human skin contact with live RF conductors is a painful experience above very low power levels. What makes it painful is that RF energy heats and damages tissue beneath the outer layer of skin, resulting in 2nd and 3rd degree burns.  Not normally superficial, RF burns heal slowly.

RF BURN

Without going into physiological details, we will simply quote one person’s testimony: “For the first half-hour or so, all I could see was a tiny dot on my fingertip, and I didn’t think much of it. As the day went on, it hurt more and more, and by the end of the day there was a big, deep, dark blister that covered my entire fingertip and hurt like hell. It took weeks to heal.”  There are some good references to RF burns at the end of this post, including a number of personal experiences.

There are a several factors involved in RF burns:  Power level (available energy), contact surface area (more is better) , grounding/return contact (less is better) and radio frequency (the body absorbs more energy at certain frequencies).

How much power is needed to create a RF burn?  Again, it varies.  There are reports of people getting fingertip burns by touching the top of the antenna connector on a relatively low-power handheld VHF transceiver (5W) and keying the PTT button with no antenna screwed in.  Obviously, a 100W HF transmitter can do much more damage than this.  You don’t need to touch a 50kW AM broadcast antenna to get a nasty RF burn.

Treatment of RF burns are just like any other type– run cold water over it and/or ice it and seek medical attention.  Avoidance is the best defense.  Of course, most RF burns are unintentional so the best we can do is make you aware.  Stay safe!

Direct RF burns cause more immediate tissue damage than indirect radiation but there is a hazard with both;  be looking for a future posting in indirect RF hazards.


RF burn references

Ham radio school

Forum with several detailed experiences reported

eHam My Very First RF Burn! interesting with experiences of many hams

EEVblog forum how does RF feel/taste? how about rf injury?

Compilation of various research studies

Biological effects of RF energy

Reddit

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Wavelength

We recently discussed radio frequency (RF) signals and radio waves.  Now let’s review the related concept of wavelength because it is often used in ham radio.

At any frequency it takes a certain amount of time for a wave to complete one cycle.  A cycle is any repeating feature of the waveform.  Radio waves have sinusoidal form.

Wavelength cycles

Because the wave moves over time, it travels a certain distance in any given period.

Wavelength distance

Wavelength is the distance a wave travels in one complete cycle.  We measure this in meters.

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Viewed in 3D animation, it’s not only cool to look at, but may help us understand it a little better.Wave animationThe red and blue sine waves are the electric and magnetic fields oscillating at right angles to each other at the radio frequency.  The constant wavelength (λ) follows E field peaks between the X and Z axes. The radio wave is moving along the Y axis (lower right).

Radio waves are typically oscillating millions of times per second (MHz).  They are traveling near the speed of light (300 million meters per second).

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The time it takes for a radio wave to complete one cycle equals the speed of light (approximately) divided by the radio frequency:

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Simplifying the math shows us that to calculate wavelength, we simply divide 300 by the frequency in MHz.  The millions (Megas) cancel each other out.  The resultant wavelength is in meters.

T3B06-2018For the center of one popular HF band the wavelength would be:  300/14.2=21m  See how it works?

The wavelength at the center of our most common VHF radio band would be:  300/146=2.05m   

Logically, higher frequencies complete one cycle in less time than lower frequencies.

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This means that the wavelength of higher frequencies is shorter than that of lower frequencies.  Frequency and wavelength are inversely proportional.

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Wavelength is simply an inverted way of thinking about radio frequency; they are mathematically related.

It helps to visualize the two overlaid on a RF spectrum chart:

RF-spectrum-RF-Page.jpgYou can see how the yellow wavelength values above the blue frequencies increase in opposite directions.  Note also how the values line up in 1/10/100s and 3/30/300s per the speed of light relationship.

Wavelength becomes practical when dealing with antennas where element lengths need to be some fraction of a particular RF wavelength.

Wavelength is also the most common descriptor of radio frequency bands.  We will follow up with this in a future topic.

Wavelength is not terribly mystifying but it isn’t very obvious either.  Hopefully this gives you a better grasp of this important subject.


A fairly technical yet easily understood video relating frequency, wavelength and the speed of light is worth watching here.

Radio Frequency (RF)

Radio signals are sent via radio waves, which are a form of electromagnetic energy or radiation. T3A07-2018

Recall that a radio wave consists of both electric and magnetic fields oscillating at right angles to each other.EM Fields.png

 

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Combining electrical and magnetic gives us the term electromagnetic.

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Like all waves, radio waves vibrate or oscillate at a specific rate or frequency.

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ewaves.gifThis vibration frequency is normally measured in cycles per second and its units are Hertz.  T5C05-2018.pngRates of oscillation in radio work are thousands and millions of Hertz (Hz).  With standardized metric prefixes for SI units , this means practical radio frequencies are in kHz, MHz, and GHz.

The common and familiar term RF is short for radio frequency.  It’s really an adjective, not a noun.  While we may say just RF (“You have a big RF leak, there, Fred”), we really mean radio frequency energy or signals.  RF is not a thing in and of itself.

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So what is a radio frequency , then?  They are a large chunk of frequencies in the middle of the electromagnetic spectrum (the range of possible frequencies from 0 to measurably high).  Technically radio frequencies start at low audio frequencies and run up to just below infrared light, basically 30Hz-300GHz.  Different sources specify other upper/lower boundaries because a more practical range is the low frequency band up through microwaves.  However you define it, this range of frequencies is  known as the radio spectrum.

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While hams can use very low frequencies on one end and go up to microwave frequencies at the high end, the more common radio amateur frequencies are in the shortwave, VHF, and UHF range.

We will follow up with detailed posts on the important topics of RF wavelength and amateur radio bands, along with RF safety.  Coming soon to Newhams.info; stay tuned.

 

Flat Ground Strap

Ever wonder why RF grounds should be flat straps and not regular wires?

This is because ordinary wires are not good conductors at frequencies higher than 50-60Hz. This complicates wiring and bonding requirements.

Impedance (effectively, AC resistance) of a conductor increases with frequency and length due to inductive reactance.  The higher the frequency, the greater the impedance.

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All conductors have some measurable inductance, and it doesn’t take much to yield significant impedance.  At KHz or MHz frequencies, long round wires might present hundreds or even thousands of Ohms impedance; not suitable for grounding.

A good ground has less than one ohm impedance.  This is a genuine safety issue.

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Since inductive reactance increases with frequency and length, safety grounds and module bonds need to be something other than long round wires when radio frequencies are involved.

When high frequency grounding is required, use short, wide, and flat conductive straps.  The high aspect ratio minimizes electrical inductance vs. a round wire, as does a short conductor.  This lowers the ground wire’s impedance at higher frequencies.

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So now you know.  Keep it flat and short (KIFS is a lousy acronym).

It’s not just a suggestion; this one might just bite you if you don’t heed the guideline!

RF Connector Types

The plug that is used for terminating cables between the receiver, transmitter or transceiver and the antenna is generally referred to as the RF connector because it carries the Radio Frequency signal to/from the equipment.

In addition to mating the radio to the antenna via a transmission line (usually a coaxial cable) it may also used on RF test equipment (antenna analyzer, power and SWR meters, spectrum analyzer) and dummy loads.  All hams should be familiar with different RF connectors so we’ll give a brief high-level description here.

Good news!  There are only four common types of RF connector used in ham radio:


PL-259

220px-uhf_pl_connector     250px-uhf-connector

By far the most common RF connector, the PL-259 is used to connect most all modern HF transceivers and VHF/UHF mobile rigs to the antenna.  The PL designation stands for plug and the 259 is an old US Signal Corps assignment.  It has a male center pin and female thread.

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The mating  receptacle found on the radios and equipment is known as a SO-239.  SO for socket, it features a female center receptacle and has male threads.

so-239

The PL-259 and SO-239 combination (details here) is frequently referred to as a “UHF connector” although this designation comes from the 1930s when UHF was considered anything above 30MHz.  It has performance limitations above 100MHz so other connector types are more suitable for true UHF use.

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N-type Continue reading